Making Twitter Work for Your Business

“Twitter is useless…my posts disappear so fast!”

That’s what I thought too when my friends said that the hype of Twitter was over.  But Twitter made a pretty big comeback in my life not too long ago and now it’s my go-to social media platform for pretty much everything.

And it can be yours too!

Facebook is known for “watching” everything you do to give you the best content in your news feed. Twitter works the same, yet my feed is completely customized to my interests with few advertisements.

Twitter allows users to pick and choose who you want to follow (and actually puts most of their content in your news feed!).  If you’re a business owner, especially one with a clearly defined niche or you have specific interests, Twitter is for you. Twitter is amazing for those who want to learn. I know that’s you (why else would you be reading this?) and it can be for your business too.

Here’s how I got a Twitter news feed set up that “speaks to me” every time I log in:

1.  Branded Profile
Clearly, I specialize in military marketing, so my profile is ALL about the military. From the photos I use to the hashtags in the description, my profile clearly states what I do for a living and my interests. Yours may include that you’re a veteran, that you own a small business, and more about what your small business does. If you have a personal account and a business account, be sure that the two are tagged in your profile so more people can find you!

2. Follow the Right People
Follow those in your niche. If you are a military spouse blogger, follow other military spouse bloggers or the people that follow them. In addition, follow profiles that can help you grow in aspects of your business – finance bloggers, business lawyers, marketing pros, etc. Build a community of information on your Twitter page to maximize its use of free information.

3.  Engage With What Matters
The more you click or share the content you’re following (as long as it’s interesting to you) the more Twitter will put posts like that in your “In Case You Missed It” section. Then, you’ll never miss the best content from users that you love. This solves the “Twitter is useless…your posts disappear so fast!” problem. Don’t forget to network with these brands and accounts to share each others’ information.

So this is all great…but how do you get your clients to care enough to follow you?

Now that you’ve got your Twitter profile set up and with content in your stream that is useful to you…it’s now important to feed that information back to your community. There are a few ways to do this:

1. Retweet (RT)
If you have built a highly specific profile feed, then you are going to start attracting similar audiences as you begin to engage. Every time you RT a status or engage with another person’s content, you are more likely to gain followers. That’s why having the above outline is so important.

2. Content Creation
To continue to attract more followers in your niche, you need to be creating content around that niche topic. For example, if you are selling military apparel, your blog can focus on fashion trends, high quality photos of your products, customer reviews and features, etc. When you feed that content to your Twitter page, you continue to grow your authority in your industry.

3.  Hashtags
Hashtags are key on Twitter. Hashtags are specific phrases that are linked to other posts with the same words. For example, if you type in #MondayMotivation into Twitter’s search bar on a Monday, you will see hundreds of posts using the same hashtag. This is the time to be focused on who your target audience is and what your business does. If you are a veteran entrepreneur, you may be tagging your posts with #vetrepreneur. If you’re a military spouse blogger, you may be tagging your posts with #milspouse. These tags help your future clients find you, as well as lead potential followers to your content.

4. Network
Find a common interest with those on Twitter. If you’re a veteran or military spouse, this may mean that you follow other veterans and military spouses that might be interested in your niche, as well as civilians who show a common interest. In general, people are open to those who are supporting their business and helping them promote it. RT their posts, reply, and engage. Offer to help them so that they are more willing to help you. If you’re targeting the right niche, their following is most likely similar to yours.  Collaboration can help you both get content and products in front of new eyes.

Now that your clients have found you, it’s important to encourage them to stay and engage with you. Twitter is fast paced, so it’s vital that they engage with your brand so that Twitter can put YOUR posts in the “In Case You Missed It” section. Build a loyal following that begs for your content and you can drive more traffic to your product or service.

Want to join a community of military spouse and veteran entrepreneurs just like you? Gain advice and tips on marketing and social media for those in the military community here!
Military Marketing GuruJenny Hale is a marketing and social media consultant, coach, and teacher for military spouse and veteran business owners.  Nicknamed “The Military Social Media Guru,” she uses her background working with military non-profits, corporate companies, the Army, and as an entrepreneur to help others struggling to meet their business dreams.  With the goal of bridging the gap between the military community’s marketing efforts to civilians and vice versa,  Jenny works to make an entrepreneur’s vision come to life.  You can follow her on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

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